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The Right And Wrong Ways To Draw the Cue Ball

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Draw Shots - A Common Mistake
The Right And Wrong Ways To Draw the Cue Ball

Into the air!

Photo (c) Matt Sherman
Watch and laugh as I uncork a common error on draw shots.

I'm purposely exhibiting a fault many beginners make on draw shots. Newbies aprubtly lift their cuestick in an effort to gain leverage on the shot, hitting the ball harder. The draw shot requires simply that the cue tip contact a hit point below the ball's equator, and not a forcible stroking motion.

Compare this photo to that on the previous page, and you can see how much I have lifted from the table.

Keep the shooting hand low if not quite level to the plane of the table.

One key thought is to hold the cue so loosely it might almost tumble to the ground except where it rests, cradled along the bottom of your fingers.

Any tension in the stroke or before the stroke is made indicates the lifting motion that launches the cue ball into the air with such comical (and dangerous!) results.

Another way in which beginners miss draw shots is in trying to put perfect pendulum motions on the stroke with their lower arms, taken from the elbow.

I go into great depth explaining elsewhere why pendulum strokes are wrong, and what the proper pool stroke really is. And while you're at it, why not check on my stance secrets and stroke and aim secrets also.

**
Loose, loose and looser still. I recommend loosening your draw grip as you take away the cue stick for the final backstroke. Loosen a second time at the top of your backswing as you reverse cue direction, and--I know this will sound strange but work great--loosen as you come into the hit impact also.

Now we're touching on a secret common to all pro and hustlers' strokes, which is often called "let the cue do the work" in error, but is actually making the stroke not deviate in movement per Newtonian physics.

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